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Horticulture offers hope for growth and jobs in rural Afghanistan

Horticulture offers hope for growth and jobs in rural Afghanistan

Until the late 1960s, Afghanistan was a major exporter of horticulture products, particularly dried fruits. Photo Credit: World Bank

Afghanistan is struggling with unemployment and poor economic performance because of drastic reductions in foreign aid and continued social instability. While efforts have been made to improve the private sector, including several sectors like mining and manufacturing, the gains have been modest as Afghanistan remains beset by conflict and instability.
 
Yet investments in agriculture, particularly horticulture, have produced tangible returns as unique weather conditions are favorable to growing produce that are in-demand in local and regional markets. 

An example can be found in Mullah Durani, a farmer from Mohammad Ali Kas village in Qarghaee district in eastern Laghman Province, who converted his field to growing grapes for fruit consumption in 2015 that is paying off in creating jobs and boosting income. “My land has generated eight times higher returns, while I can use the local workforce on my own farm instead of sending them to cities to work for others,” says Mullah Durani. “I have also been able to create seasonal jobs for a number of villagers during harvesting.”
 
The key to his success, he says, was choosing the right variety of grapes instead of grains. “My recently established vineyard produces grapes at a time when there are almost no domestic fruits in the market and in return, I get higher market prices,” he points out. “This year I sold about $4,000 worth of grapes from 2,000 square meters of land.”
 
By converting his field to growing grapes, Mullah Durani received investment support and technical assistance from the Afghanistan Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock under its National Horticulture and Livestock Project (NHLP). The project is funded by the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF) and helps farmers in selected districts adopt better production practices.

by · Tuesday, 19 September 2017 · Afghanistan
Horticulture offers hope for growth and jobs in rural Afghanistan

Horticulture offers hope for growth and jobs in rural Afghanistan

Until the late 1960s, Afghanistan was a major exporter of horticulture products, particularly dried fruits. Photo Credit: World Bank

Afghanistan is struggling with unemployment and poor economic performance because of drastic reductions in foreign aid and continued social instability. While efforts have been made to improve the private sector, including several sectors like mining and manufacturing, the gains have been modest as Afghanistan remains beset by conflict and instability.
 
Yet investments in agriculture, particularly horticulture, have produced tangible returns as unique weather conditions are favorable to growing produce that are in-demand in local and regional markets. 

An example can be found in Mullah Durani, a farmer from Mohammad Ali Kas village in Qarghaee district in eastern Laghman Province, who converted his field to growing grapes for fruit consumption in 2015 that is paying off in creating jobs and boosting income. “My land has generated eight times higher returns, while I can use the local workforce on my own farm instead of sending them to cities to work for others,” says Mullah Durani. “I have also been able to create seasonal jobs for a number of villagers during harvesting.”
 
The key to his success, he says, was choosing the right variety of grapes instead of grains. “My recently established vineyard produces grapes at a time when there are almost no domestic fruits in the market and in return, I get higher market prices,” he points out. “This year I sold about $4,000 worth of grapes from 2,000 square meters of land.”
 
By converting his field to growing grapes, Mullah Durani received investment support and technical assistance from the Afghanistan Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock under its National Horticulture and Livestock Project (NHLP). The project is funded by the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF) and helps farmers in selected districts adopt better production practices.

by · Tuesday, 19 September 2017 · Afghanistan
Horticulture offers hope for growth and jobs in rural Afghanistan

Horticulture offers hope for growth and jobs in rural Afghanistan

Until the late 1960s, Afghanistan was a major exporter of horticulture products, particularly dried fruits. Photo Credit: World Bank

Afghanistan is struggling with unemployment and poor economic performance because of drastic reductions in foreign aid and continued social instability. While efforts have been made to improve the private sector, including several sectors like mining and manufacturing, the gains have been modest as Afghanistan remains beset by conflict and instability.
 
Yet investments in agriculture, particularly horticulture, have produced tangible returns as unique weather conditions are favorable to growing produce that are in-demand in local and regional markets. 

An example can be found in Mullah Durani, a farmer from Mohammad Ali Kas village in Qarghaee district in eastern Laghman Province, who converted his field to growing grapes for fruit consumption in 2015 that is paying off in creating jobs and boosting income. “My land has generated eight times higher returns, while I can use the local workforce on my own farm instead of sending them to cities to work for others,” says Mullah Durani. “I have also been able to create seasonal jobs for a number of villagers during harvesting.”
 
The key to his success, he says, was choosing the right variety of grapes instead of grains. “My recently established vineyard produces grapes at a time when there are almost no domestic fruits in the market and in return, I get higher market prices,” he points out. “This year I sold about $4,000 worth of grapes from 2,000 square meters of land.”
 
By converting his field to growing grapes, Mullah Durani received investment support and technical assistance from the Afghanistan Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock under its National Horticulture and Livestock Project (NHLP). The project is funded by the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF) and helps farmers in selected districts adopt better production practices.

by · Tuesday, 19 September 2017 · Afghanistan
Horticulture offers hope for growth and jobs in rural Afghanistan

Horticulture offers hope for growth and jobs in rural Afghanistan

Until the late 1960s, Afghanistan was a major exporter of horticulture products, particularly dried fruits. Photo Credit: World Bank

Afghanistan is struggling with unemployment and poor economic performance because of drastic reductions in foreign aid and continued social instability. While efforts have been made to improve the private sector, including several sectors like mining and manufacturing, the gains have been modest as Afghanistan remains beset by conflict and instability.
 
Yet investments in agriculture, particularly horticulture, have produced tangible returns as unique weather conditions are favorable to growing produce that are in-demand in local and regional markets. 

An example can be found in Mullah Durani, a farmer from Mohammad Ali Kas village in Qarghaee district in eastern Laghman Province, who converted his field to growing grapes for fruit consumption in 2015 that is paying off in creating jobs and boosting income. “My land has generated eight times higher returns, while I can use the local workforce on my own farm instead of sending them to cities to work for others,” says Mullah Durani. “I have also been able to create seasonal jobs for a number of villagers during harvesting.”
 
The key to his success, he says, was choosing the right variety of grapes instead of grains. “My recently established vineyard produces grapes at a time when there are almost no domestic fruits in the market and in return, I get higher market prices,” he points out. “This year I sold about $4,000 worth of grapes from 2,000 square meters of land.”
 
By converting his field to growing grapes, Mullah Durani received investment support and technical assistance from the Afghanistan Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock under its National Horticulture and Livestock Project (NHLP). The project is funded by the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF) and helps farmers in selected districts adopt better production practices.

by · Tuesday, 19 September 2017 · Afghanistan
Horticulture offers hope for growth and jobs in rural Afghanistan

Horticulture offers hope for growth and jobs in rural Afghanistan

Until the late 1960s, Afghanistan was a major exporter of horticulture products, particularly dried fruits. Photo Credit: World Bank

Afghanistan is struggling with unemployment and poor economic performance because of drastic reductions in foreign aid and continued social instability. While efforts have been made to improve the private sector, including several sectors like mining and manufacturing, the gains have been modest as Afghanistan remains beset by conflict and instability.
 
Yet investments in agriculture, particularly horticulture, have produced tangible returns as unique weather conditions are favorable to growing produce that are in-demand in local and regional markets. 

An example can be found in Mullah Durani, a farmer from Mohammad Ali Kas village in Qarghaee district in eastern Laghman Province, who converted his field to growing grapes for fruit consumption in 2015 that is paying off in creating jobs and boosting income. “My land has generated eight times higher returns, while I can use the local workforce on my own farm instead of sending them to cities to work for others,” says Mullah Durani. “I have also been able to create seasonal jobs for a number of villagers during harvesting.”
 
The key to his success, he says, was choosing the right variety of grapes instead of grains. “My recently established vineyard produces grapes at a time when there are almost no domestic fruits in the market and in return, I get higher market prices,” he points out. “This year I sold about $4,000 worth of grapes from 2,000 square meters of land.”
 
By converting his field to growing grapes, Mullah Durani received investment support and technical assistance from the Afghanistan Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock under its National Horticulture and Livestock Project (NHLP). The project is funded by the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF) and helps farmers in selected districts adopt better production practices.

by · Tuesday, 19 September 2017 · Afghanistan

DTI-ARMM launches social enterprise in poorest of the poor region

Malang is hopeful that through the social enterprise, Mindanaoans will find a way to move out of poverty. “If we achieve freedom from hunger, then …

by · Tuesday, 19 September 2017 · Philippines

DTI-ARMM launches social enterprise in poorest of the poor region

Malang is hopeful that through the social enterprise, Mindanaoans will find a way to move out of poverty. “If we achieve freedom from hunger, then …

by · Tuesday, 19 September 2017 · Philippines

The real test of economic growth

“Inclusive growth” is a valid goal for a country because social inequality breeds poverty and discontent which, in turn, provide the powder keg …

by · Monday, 18 September 2017 · Philippines

3.2m kids at ‘high risk’, govt told

… young drug addicts, stateless children with no legal rights, children with learning problems, children with disabilities and those facing severe poverty …

by · Monday, 18 September 2017 · Thailand
តោះនិយាយ និងច្រៀងអំពីលុយ៖ យុទ្ធនាការថ្មី ជួយដល់មនុស្សជំនាន់ក្រោយរបស់កម្ពុជាឲ្យយល់ដឹងអំពីការគ្រប់គ្រងហិរញ្ញវត្ថុ

តោះនិយាយ និងច្រៀងអំពីលុយ៖ យុទ្ធនាការថ្មី ជួយដល់មនុស្សជំនាន់ក្រោយរបស់កម្ពុជាឲ្យយល់ដឹងអំពីការគ្រប់គ្រងហិរញ្ញវត្ថុ

ធនាគារពិភពលោកចាប់ដៃគូរជាមួយមជ្ឈមណ្ឌលព័ត៌មានស្រ្តីកម្ពុជា រៀបចំកម្មវិធីវិទ្យុ “តោះនិយាយពីលុយ” ដើម្បីជួយកសាងស្ថេរភាពហិរញ្ញវត្ថុនៅកម្ពុជា។

ការគ្រប់គ្រងហិរញ្ញវត្ថុដែលមានហានិភ័យក្នុងចំណោមប្រជាពលរដ្ឋកម្ពុជាជំនាន់ក្រោយសហសវត្សរ៍ បានរីករាលដាលកាន់តែខ្លាំងឡើងនៅក្នុងប្រទេស ជាពិសេស ក្នុងចំណោមក្រុមយុវជនអាយុចន្លោះពី ១៨ ដល់ ៣៥ឆ្នាំ។ ខណៈដែលពួកគេជាអតិថិជនដ៏សំខាន់សម្រាប់វិស័យហិរញ្ញវត្ថុនិងធនាគារ អាកប្បកិរិយារបស់ពួកគេ ជាញឹកញយ ត្រូវបានឃុំគ្រងដោយការចាយវាយខ្ជះខ្ជាយ និងការខ្ចីលុយគេច្រើនហួសកំណត់។
 
ក៏ប៉ុន្តែ មនុស្សជំនាន់នេះ ក៏មានចំណេះដឹងច្រើនអំពីបច្ចេកវិទ្យាទំនើបផងដែរ ដោយស្គាល់យ៉ាងច្រើនអំពីបណ្តាញសង្គម ដូចជា ហ្វេសប៊ុក និងយូធូប វិទ្យុ ទូរទស្សន៍ អ៊ីនធើណេត និងទូរស័ព្ទទំនើប។ បណ្តាញទាំងនេះ មាននៅក្នុងតំបន់ទីក្រុងរួចហើយ និងកំពុងតែរីករាលដាលដល់តាមបណ្តាខេត្តនៅទូទាំងប្រទេស។ 
 
ដោយមើលឃើញបញ្ហានេះ យើងបានគិតដល់ “វិធីសាស្ត្រថ្មីមួយ” ក្នុងការជួយដោះស្រាយបញ្ហានេះ និងផ្សព្វផ្សាយដល់មនុស្សក្មេងៗឲ្យបានដឹង។ ការប្រើប្រាស់បណ្តាញសង្គម ក្រុមជំនាញផ្នែកហិរញ្ញវត្ថុនិងទីផ្សាររបស់ធនាគារពិភពលោក បានចាប់ផ្តើមធ្វើយុទ្ធនាការថ្មីមួយដែលមានឈ្មោះថា “តោះ ចូរយើងជជែកអំពីលុយ” ដែលជាផ្នែកមួយនៃកិច្ចប្រឹងប្រែងរួមរបស់យើងក្នុងការកសាងស្ថេរភាពហិរញ្ញវត្ថុនៅក្នុងប្រទេសកម្ពុជា។
 
ដោយសហការជាមួយធនាគារជាតិនៃកម្ពុជា និងគាំទ្រដោយមូលនិធិទំនុកចិត្តកូរ៉េ យើងមានបំណងចង់ដោះស្រាយបញ្ហាហិរញ្ញវត្ថុរបស់អតិថិជន និងផ្លាស់ប្តូរការគ្រប់គ្រងហិរញ្ញវត្ថុរបស់ពលរដ្ឋកម្ពុជា តាមរយៈកម្មវិធីវិទ្យុដែលមានឈ្មោះថា “តោះ ចូរយើងនិយាយពីលុយ”។ កម្មវិធីនេះ បានចាក់ផ្សាយទូទាំងប្រទេស ៣ដងក្នុងមួយសប្តាហ៍ ពីខែធ្នូ ឆ្នាំ ២០១៦ ដល់ ខែកុម្ភៈ ឆ្នាំ ២០១៧ តាមវិទ្យុស្ត្រី អេហ្វអឹម ១០២ និងតាមទំព័រហ្វេសប៊ុករបស់វិទ្យុនេះ។
 
កម្មវិធីវិទ្យុនេះ បានទាក់ទាញអ្នកស្តាប់បានជាង ១លាននាក់នៅទូទាំងប្រទេស។ នៅលើហ្វេសប៊ុក កម្មវិធីនេះ ទទួលបានអ្នកចុចមើលជាមធ្យម ៤.០០០ដង។ ណាណា ដែលជាឌីជេ កម្មវិធីនេះ គឺជាតារាវិទ្យុខ្មែរល្បីឈ្មោះម្នាក់ដែលមានអ្នកតាមមើលហ្វេសប៊ុករបស់គាត់ជាង ៥០០.០០០នាក់ និងស្វែងរកការគាំទ្រសម្រាប់ស្ត្រីដើម្បីគ្រប់គ្រងហិរញ្ញវត្ថុគ្រួសាររបស់ខ្លួន និងបង្កើតជម្រើសហិរញ្ញវត្ថុដែលសមហេតុផល។
 
សាររបស់កម្មវិធីនេះ បានផ្សព្វផ្សាយច្រើនដងទៅឆ្ងាយនិងគ្រប់ទិសទីក្នុងចំណោមពលរដ្ឋកម្ពុជា។ មានការលើកឡើងនូវសំណួរពិបាកជាច្រើនអំពីហិរញ្ញវត្ថុគ្រួសារ និងការគ្រប់គ្រងលុយ និងបានផ្តល់នូវចម្លើយជាក់ស្តែងជាច្រើនចំពោះសំណួរពិបាកៗទាំងឡាយទាក់ទងនឹងលុយ ដែលគ្រួសារកម្ពុជាកំពុងជួបប្រទះ។
 
បន្ទាប់ពីកម្មវិធីបានចាប់ផ្តើម យើងបានបង្វែរប្រធានបទចេញក្រៅថែមបន្តិចទៀត ដោយភ្ជាប់​ការជជែកគ្នាអំពីលុយជាមួយនឹងការច្រៀងចម្រៀងអំពីលុយ។ យើងបានអញ្ជើញលោក អូន ដែលជាតារាចម្រៀងវ័យក្មេងមានប្រជាប្រិយបំផុតនៅកម្ពុជា ឲ្យច្រៀងចម្រៀង “លុយ” គឺជាចម្រៀងច្រៀងអំពីលុយ។

អ្នកចម្រៀងដែលមានប្រជាប្រិយនៅកម្ពុជា លោក អូន បានជួយផ្សព្វផ្សាយបង្កើនការយល់ដឹងអំពីវិធីនានាក្នុងការគ្រប់គ្រងលុយឲ្យបានល្អប្រសើរតាមរយៈចម្រៀងរបស់គាត់។

ចម្រៀងនេះ និយាយអំពីបទពិសោធន៍ផ្ទាល់របស់អ្នកចម្រៀង កំហុសរបស់គាត់ និងមេរៀនដែលគាត់ទទួលបាន។ ការរក្សាសារឲ្យងាយយល់និងមានលក្ខណៈកំប្លែង គាត់បានច្រៀងអំពីការគ្រប់គ្រងលុយ ការចំណាយច្រើនជាងចំណូល ការចៀសវាងខ្ចីលុយគេបើមិនចាំបាច់ និងការសន្សំលុយ។ 
 

វីដេអូចម្រៀងដែលបានផ្សព្វផ្សាយនៅខែឧសភា ឆ្នាំ ២០១៧ តាមហ្វេសប៊ុកនិងយូធូប ទទួលបានការចាប់អារម្មណ៍ភ្លាមៗនៅទូទាំងប្រទេស។ នៅត្រឹមខែមិថុនា ឆ្នាំ ២០១៧ វីដេអូនេះ មានអ្នកទស្សនាចំនួនជាង ១លានដង ដែលជាចំនួនមួយខ្ពស់ធៀបនឹងបទចម្រៀងពេញនិយមដទៃៗទៀតនៅក្នុងប្រទេសកម្ពុជា។

មានពលរដ្ឋជាង ៣០.០០០នាក់ បានចែកចាយវីដេអូចម្រៀងនេះបន្តនៅលើហ្វេសប៊ុក។ មានមនុស្សជាច្រើនបានបញ្ចេញមតិយោបល់ល្អៗចំពោះវីដេអូនេះ ដោយបាននិយាយថា ៖ នេះគឺជាចម្រៀងមួយដែលមានអត្ថន័យល្អ ដែលច្រៀងឲ្យមនុស្សមានការប្រយ័ត្នប្រយែងជាងមុនចំពោះលុយកាក់ ត្រូវចៀសវាងចំណាយលើសនិងជាប់បំណុល ឈប់ឆ្កួតនឹងលុយ គិតឲ្យបានពីរដងមុននឹងចំណាយ សន្សំលុយ និងមានច្រើនទៀត។ 

តាមរយៈបទពិសោធន៍នៃការជួលកម្មវិធីវិទ្យុរបស់យើង និងអ្នកសិល្បៈល្បីនៅក្នុងប្រទេសកម្ពុជា យើងបានរកឃើញថា តន្ត្រី ទោះបីជាវាចម្លែកក្តី ក៏មានសក្តានុពលគ្របដណ្តប់ទៅដល់មនុស្សជំនាន់ថ្មីដែរ។ រហូតមកដល់បច្ចុប្បន្ននេះ មានលទ្ធផលជាច្រើនបញ្ជាក់អះអាងថា វិទ្យុនិងការផ្សព្វផ្សាយវីដេអូលើបណ្តាញសង្គម អាចធ្វើឲ្យមានការផ្លាស់ប្តូរឥរិយាបទក្នុងការគ្រប់គ្រងហិរញ្ញវត្ថុរបស់មនុស្ស និងពង្រឹងសមត្ថភាពផ្នែកហិរញ្ញវត្ថុរបស់កម្ពុជា។ 

រួមគ្នាជាមួយសកម្មភាពជាប្រពៃណីជាច្រើនទៀត ដូចជា ចំណាត់ការគោលនយោបាយដើម្បីគ្រប់គ្រងហានិភ័យនិងស្ថេរភាពក្នុងវិស័យហិរញ្ញវត្ថុ ការផ្ញើសារដោយផ្ទាល់ទៅកាន់អតិថិជនហិរញ្ញវត្ថុស្តីពីការគ្រប់គ្រងហិរញ្ញវត្ថុដោយប្រយ័ត្នប្រយែង ក៏អាចរួមចំណែកក្នុងការធ្វើឲ្យយើងសម្រេចគោលបំណងផ្នែកហិរញ្ញវត្ថុរបស់យើងបានដែរ។ ប្រសិទ្ធិភាពនៃការផ្សព្វផ្សាយឲ្យទៅដល់មហាជនរបស់វិធីសាស្ត្រនេះ នឹងចាំបាច់ត្រូវត្រួតពិនិត្យតាមដានដោយប្រយ័ត្នប្រយែង ដើម្បីរៀនសូត្របន្ថែមទៀតអំពីផលប៉ះពាល់របស់វា។

by · Monday, 18 September 2017 · Uncategorised