India

Mental illness is curable, treatable, and preventable: a story of hope from India

Mental illness is curable, treatable, and preventable: a story of hope from India

On World Mental Health Day, here’s a fact to reflect on: people with mental illness are among the socially excluded and marginalized groups in society. They are often misunderstood, ignored, or simply invisible.
 
In India alone, an estimated 70 million people—or 5% of the population—suffer from mental illness. The southern state of Tamil Nadu, for instance, has one million people living mental disorders—about 3-5 cases per village. Meanwhile, the country faces a severe shortage of psychiatrists and psychiatrist nurses, and clinical care is scarce in rural India. Due to deep social stigma related to mental illness, such serious issues are largely invisible at the community level.

That’s why, in 2012, we launched a comprehensive social and clinical care program with the government of Tamil Nadu to inform and educate local communities on mental health issues, as well as to encourage families and people affected by mental illness to seek treatment. Working with leading local health practitioners, we based the campaign on a core message that was simple, powerful, and resonated with the community:
 

 

Through a poster on do’s and don’ts of addressing mental illness, the campaign advised the community to
1) seek help from a psychiatrist, 2) start medication, 3) attend counseling sessions, and 4) join self-help groups. (Image: TNEPRP / World Bank)
by · Monday, 10 October 2016 · India

India’s Top Economist Announces His Support For Universal Basic Income

The chief economic advisor to the government of India, Arvind Subramanian, has now voiced support for a universal basic income (UBI) to end poverty …

by · Saturday, 8 October 2016 · India, Laos

Indian Hybrid Organization Fighting against Unequal Access to Primary Healthcare

Doctor shortage, poor infrastructure, long wait times (especially for women), high diagnostic costs and extensive travel for treatment…all of these results in avoidable deaths and high mortality rate in rural India. According to the Lancet (2015), more than 2,000 primary health centers in India were operated without a doctor and more than 5,000 have no pharmacist.

by · Wednesday, 5 October 2016 · India

Indian Hybrid Organization Fighting against Unequal Access to Primary Healthcare

Doctor shortage, poor infrastructure, long wait times (especially for women), high diagnostic costs and extensive travel for treatment…all of these results in avoidable deaths and high mortality rate in rural India. According to the Lancet (2015), more than 2,000 primary health centers in India were operated without a doctor and more than 5,000 have no pharmacist.

by · Wednesday, 5 October 2016 · India

Jay Z in debut India performance for anti-poverty gig

MUMBAI | Rap megastar Jay Z will make his debut performance in India at a music festival to raise awareness about poverty, event organizers said …

by · Tuesday, 13 September 2016 · India, Philippines

Coldplay to play India as anti-poverty concert expands

NEW YORK – Rockers Coldplay will play their first-ever show in India in a free performance as the anti-poverty Global Citizen Festival on Friday …

by · Saturday, 10 September 2016 · India, Thailand

India Should Focus On Low End Manufacturing: Chinese Media

“China lifted millions of people out of poverty in the last three decades by focusing on developing its own manufacturing industry”, an article in the …

by · Tuesday, 30 August 2016 · China, India, Laos
What will it take for India to reach double digit growth?

What will it take for India to reach double digit growth?

 
 

“Despite the global slowdown, India has been one of the few countries to have shown remarkable growth in the last financial year. While this has been an achievement in itself, this growth rate can be taken to double-digits.” This was the key message of Dr. Frederico Gil Sander, Sr. Country Economist, World Bank Group, New Delhi. Dr. Gil Sander was speaking to students at the IIM Ahmedabad as part of the World Bank – IIM Discussion Series. The discussion centered around “Financing Double-digit Growth: Current and Long-term Challenges of India’s Financial Sector”.

Dr. Gil Sander noted that urban consumption and public investment have been the key drivers for current growth. Additionally, a good monsoon this year is expected to give a boost to rural consumption. These, coupled with the promised emphasis on supply-side factors such as labour reforms, the inclusion of more women in the labour force, and the timely implementation of GST can boost economic growth. To further increase this growth rate, potentially to double-digits, these drivers will first have to be augmented by productive capacity investment, which in turn depends on ease of credit availability from banks. However, credit growth in India is marred primarily by high lending rates, priority sector lending regulations and rising non-performing assets (NPAs).

by · Friday, 19 August 2016 · India

Basic income paid to the poor can transform lives

Contrary to what sceptics predicted the basic incomes model created more economic activity and workThe idea of providing low-income people with money to reduce poverty and insecurity was, until recently, regarded with scepticism in development circles….

by · Thursday, 18 December 2014 · India

How can India end this tide of violence against women? | KumKum Dasgupta

Despite rising levels of education, gender awareness and stringent pro-women laws, change has been slow and violence against women is increasing The rape of a young woman by a taxi driver in Delhi has again left the city and the country traumatised, an…

by · Wednesday, 10 December 2014 · India, Oman